Useful resources to learn and practice French

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Caroline MosserInglês
20 de Dezembro de 2017
319
2 minutos
While nothing compares to practicing a language through conversations and interactions with it in a natural setting, it is important to recognize that it can be very difficult to do so extensively, whether it is due to availability or cost. Good resources and good autonomous studying practices combined with a reasonable amount of practices can go a long way.

Here is a list of resources that I have worked with in and out of my classrooms and that I have found to be effective, relevant, or that students have enjoyed.

  • English Grammar Students of French
https://www.amazon.com/English-Grammar-Students-French-Learning/dp/0934034427
This one is very useful for English speakers. A lot of students struggle with grammar because they don't know its rules (even though they apply it every day!). This book is really helpful because it explains English grammar and compares it to its French equivalent.
Bonus: you can find used older editions for a very low price!

  • ABC DELF A2
https://www.amazon.fr/ABC-DELF-Niveau-A2-Livre/dp/2090381728
I have use this one for its listening and reading exercices that are very well done. While it is geared towards the A2 level, I find a lot of them easy enough to be used in A1 as well.
I don't like the one available for A1 as much, its scope is more limited et felt that it wouldn't take much time to complete.

  • Le Besherelle (conjugation)
https://www.amazon.com/Bescherelle-Conjugaison-Pour-Tous-Reference/dp/2218951983/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1513268086&sr=1-2&keywords=besherelle
A classic! One of the best references for verb conjugations. As a kid in France, that's the one I had.
If you prefer online material, l'OBS conjugaison is great too! http://la-conjugaison.nouvelobs.com/

  • Alter Ego 3 (B1) and Edito B1
https://www.amazon.com/Alter-Ego-Methode-Francais-French/dp/2011555124/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1513268418&sr=1-1&keywords=alter+ego+3
https://www.amazon.com/Nouvel-Edito-Livre-LEleve-French/dp/2278072692/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1513268471&sr=1-1&keywords=french+edition+b1
For the intermediate levels, I like to mix these two up. What I like in Alter Ego 3 is the material used, a lot of cultural artifacts, as well as tips for writing. It is a fun book with relevant. However, it does lack vocabulary sections, which I still find necessary at that level. It is for that reason, that overall, I prefer Edito which I find a little more well-rounded as it includes a lot of artifacts, grammar explanations and vocabulary exercises.

  • http://www.wordreference.com/
This is my favorite online dictionary because it shows expressions using the search word, its usages as well as forums to ask questions about unclear usages.

  • http://www.bonjourdefrance.com/
This website offers a lot of self-correcting exercises for all levels and all language-skills. It is a great resource to practice! However, depending on who build the exercices you work on, you don't necessary have any explanations. So if you need help understanding a specific grammar point, it might not be the best.
A must to use if you want to check that you know a specific aspect of the language!

  • https://www.podcastfrancaisfacile.com/
A lot of resources available here too. I have only used it for listening comprehesion so far, so I cannot say anything about the rest. But the listening ones are great. For a lot of students, listening comprehension is one of the hardest thing to master, and this website offers a lot of audio files with scripts so that you can really practice on your own.

Please leave a comment if you have material that you love to use!


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Caroline

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$27.00
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Flag
Francês
globe
França
time
555
Francês
Nativo
,
Inglês
C2
,
Alemão
B1
,
Espanhol
B1
Bio: Caroline Mosser is an educator, translator, writer and independent scholar. She has lived and worked in both France and the United States, and is looking forward to more adventures. After earning her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of South Carolina, she has taught French as a postdoctoral fellow at Utah State University. As a graduate student, she participated in and taught for the competitive Social Advocacy and Ethical Life scholarship program at USC. Having always been fascinated by both the sciences and the humanities, she has focused her work on their connection through the study of the representations of science and technology in popular culture. A life-long learner, she enjoys sharing her knowledge through teaching and participating in various academic and cultural projects (such as translating, interpreting, and editing). In her free time, she enjoys watching science fiction movies and TV shows as well as skating and hiking to make up for her cooking Teaching philosophy: Throughout my academic career, I have been teaching courses in French and English and am comfortable with both languages. I present myself as a mentor to students. Because I believe that teaching is a collaboration between instructor and students, I include open-ended assignment in which they explore their own interest and how it relates to our class. In a basic French-language course, I focus on creating a safe environment where students feel comfortable to participate. Being a native speaker of French, I use my experience of learning English to relate to my students and build a two-way conversation. I tell them on the first day of class that they can correct my English. Students have reacted positively and tend to feel more comfortable expressing their difficulties. I also privilege positive feedback, using an informative rather than corrective feedback policy, and metalinguistic feedback allowing students to figure out their mistake. As a facilitator, I use mostly French in order to build students’ ability to understand the language through contextual clues. I use cultural or personal artifacts to provide visual clues and authentic examples. For instance, when teaching about food, I use menus from French restaurants, asking what they would like to order, which ingredients they expect to find, leading to a discussion comparing what is offered in their favorite restaurants and what they would recommend. In the case of a higher level French-language class, I privilege contemporary material because it is more relevant to students as they include structures and vocabulary likely to be encountered outside of the classroom. Students reflect on language as form and meaning in context and finally, produce their own texts. Doing so allows me to start a discussion on how ideas can be represented differently. It allows us to discuss how meaning can take many forms. Language and literature courses are often criticized for not being practical or for being too focused on textbooks. I disagree. These courses are windows to a world of possibilities and it is my responsibility to make sure that students are able and willing to open them.
Flag
Francês
globe
França
time
555
Francês
Nativo
,
Inglês
C2
,
Alemão
B1
,
Espanhol
B1
Bio: Caroline Mosser is an educator, translator, writer and independent scholar. She has lived and worked in both France and the United States, and is looking forward to more adventures. After earning her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from the University of South Carolina, she has taught French as a postdoctoral fellow at Utah State University. As a graduate student, she participated in and taught for the competitive Social Advocacy and Ethical Life scholarship program at USC. Having always been fascinated by both the sciences and the humanities, she has focused her work on their connection through the study of the representations of science and technology in popular culture. A life-long learner, she enjoys sharing her knowledge through teaching and participating in various academic and cultural projects (such as translating, interpreting, and editing). In her free time, she enjoys watching science fiction movies and TV shows as well as skating and hiking to make up for her cooking Teaching philosophy: Throughout my academic career, I have been teaching courses in French and English and am comfortable with both languages. I present myself as a mentor to students. Because I believe that teaching is a collaboration between instructor and students, I include open-ended assignment in which they explore their own interest and how it relates to our class. In a basic French-language course, I focus on creating a safe environment where students feel comfortable to participate. Being a native speaker of French, I use my experience of learning English to relate to my students and build a two-way conversation. I tell them on the first day of class that they can correct my English. Students have reacted positively and tend to feel more comfortable expressing their difficulties. I also privilege positive feedback, using an informative rather than corrective feedback policy, and metalinguistic feedback allowing students to figure out their mistake. As a facilitator, I use mostly French in order to build students’ ability to understand the language through contextual clues. I use cultural or personal artifacts to provide visual clues and authentic examples. For instance, when teaching about food, I use menus from French restaurants, asking what they would like to order, which ingredients they expect to find, leading to a discussion comparing what is offered in their favorite restaurants and what they would recommend. In the case of a higher level French-language class, I privilege contemporary material because it is more relevant to students as they include structures and vocabulary likely to be encountered outside of the classroom. Students reflect on language as form and meaning in context and finally, produce their own texts. Doing so allows me to start a discussion on how ideas can be represented differently. It allows us to discuss how meaning can take many forms. Language and literature courses are often criticized for not being practical or for being too focused on textbooks. I disagree. These courses are windows to a world of possibilities and it is my responsibility to make sure that students are able and willing to open them.

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